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This Plant Eats Insects

The pitcher plant, shown here, which grows in the high mountains of California, has perfected an ingenious contrivance for catching and digesting insects. At the top of the pitcher, so called, seen above, there is an opaque lattice work in the interstices of which is a translucent, mica-like substance. The insect, entering from beneath, in search of shelter, finds itself in a cosy chamber, well lined, and weather proof. Once inside the chamber, however, it discovers that it is being swallowed, irresistibly-and the plant finally deposits it in the stomach below, where it digests it with a secretion akin to hydrochloric acid. There are several other known carnivorous plants, showing that at some time in their ancestry, the soil has not given them sufficient nutriment for their needs.

This Plant Eats Insects

This image is from: Luther Burbank: his methods and discoveries and their practical application. Volume 1 Chapter 2